Coat’s Disease

In Coats disease, there is eye disarray which is differentiated by abnormal development of the blood vessels in the retina. Most people begin showing the symptoms in the childhood. Early signs and symptoms of the disease may include vision loss, crossed eye and white mass in the pupil behind the lens of the eye. Over the time the Coats disease may also lead to retinal detachment, glaucoma, and clouding of the lens which is cataract formation. In general, only one of the eye is affected. The Coats disease cannot be inherited but the underlying cause is yet unknown. Treatment depends on the symptoms present and may include cryotherapy and laser photocoagulation, sometimes even the usage of both the process at one time. Steroids for inflammation is recommended and surgery for the retinal detachment.

In Coats disease, the blood vessels are dilated, abnormally twisted and leaky. This prevents the normal flow of the blood and allows fluids to leak out of the blood vessels causing a buildup of fatty material in the retina. the situation gets worst if a large amount of fluid builds up which can also cause a detachment of the retina and loss of vision.

Causes and risk factor of Coats disease

No causes or risk factor are known as the underlying condition. There is some evidence to suggest that Coats disease is caused by somatic mutation of the Norrie disease protein (NDP) gene. There is no known risk factor although the condition is more common in male which is about three times as often in the female.

Symptoms and signs of Coats disease

There is a gradual vision loss and it may not be recognized at the first due to the young age at which the disease begins. Since it starts in one eye the child may compensate well and do not notice that the vision is bad in the other eye. for the children at the age of 6-9 years of age, it is commonly seen. It’s a painless disease.

Generally, only one eye is affected and is common in the male. When only one eye is involved the individual may carry out almost all the other activities normally without any limitation. So it is generally not noticed by any individual and even parents of the child.

Diagnosis of Coats disease

It can be diagnosed on the schedule eye checkup by the eye specialist, frequently it is not suspected until a late stage when a child develops cloudy white or yellow pupil due to the presence of cataract or retinal detachment. Retinal damage may be visible to the doctor due to the accumulation of cholesterol deposits in the vessels. At later stage, glaucoma may occur. Since it develops very slowly it is often diagnosed until late since the individual usually adapts to slow progressive loss of peripheral vision in one eye.In Coats disease there is eye disarray which is differentiated by abnormal development of the blood vessels in the retina. Most people begin showing the symptoms in the childhood. Early signs and symptoms of the disease may include vision loss, crossed eye and white mass in the pupil behind the lens of the eye. Over the time the Coats disease may also lead to retinal detachment, glaucoma and clouding of the lens which is cataract formation. In general only one of the eye is affected. The Coats disease cannot be inherited but the underlying cause is yet unknown. Treatment depends on the symptoms present and may include cryotherapy and laser photocoagulation , sometimes even the usage of both the process at one time. Steroids for inflammation is recommended and surgery for the retinal detachment.

In Coats disease the blood vessels are dilated, abnormally twisted and leaky. This prevents the normal flow of the blood and allow fluids too leak out of the blood vessels causing buildup of fatty material into the retina. the situation gets worst if large amount of fluid builds up which can also cause a detachment of the retina and loss of vision.

Causes and risk factor of Coats disease

No causes or risk factor are known for the underlying condition. There are some evidence to suggest that Coats disease is caused by somatic mutation of the Norrie disease protein (NDP) gene. There are no known risk factor although the condition is more common in male which is about three times as often in female.

Symptoms and signs of Coats disease

There is a gradual vision loss and it may not be recognized at the first due to young age at which the disease begins. Since it starts in one eye the child may compensate well and do not notice that the vision is bad in the other eye. for the children at the age of 6-9 years of age it is commonly seen. Its a painless disease.

Generally only one eye is affected and is common in male. When only one eye is involved the individual may carry out almost all the other activities normally without and limitation. So it is generally not noticed by any individual and even parents of the child.

Diagnosis of Coats disease

It can be diagnosed on the schedule eye checkup by the eye specialist, frequently it is not suspected until a late stage when a child develops cloudy white or yellow pupil due to the presence of cataract or retinal detachment. Retinal damage may be visible to the doctor due to accumulation of cholesterol deposits in the vessels. At later stage glaucoma may occur. Since it develops very slowly it is often diagnosed until late since the individual usually adapts to slow progressive loss of peripheral vision in one eye.